Coffee Drinkers: How To Make Your Habit Less Worrisome From A Dental Health Perspective

Do you feel guilty every time you reach for a cup of coffee? It's no secret, after all, that this favorite beverages leads to yellowed teeth and can also perpetuate tooth decay if you happened to stir some sugar, milk or creamer into it. Thankfully, you don't have to give up your coffee in order to protect your teeth. Here are a few easy ways to make your coffee habit less worrisome from a dental health perspective. Read More 

Crooked Teeth? Know The 4 Kinds Of Braces You Have To Choose From

Getting braces as a child is practically a right of passage for some people, with their parents deciding that it needs to be done and selecting the type of braces. With metal braces being so common, you may not even been aware that there are other options. If you want to fix your crooked teeth and can decide on the type of braces that you want, be aware of these 4 options. Read More 

Dental Implant Sites Hurt? Try These Simple Pain Relief Tips

If your multiple dental implant sites hurt and nothing you take eases the pain, you may wonder if the pain will ever go away. Although swelling is a common occurrence after dental implant surgery, it can make it difficult to eat, sleep and even relax. The swelling should subside within a few days, but some people may experience the problem longer than others. With the right tips, you can find some relief to help your dental implants heal. Read More 

3 Factors That Impact Dentist Sensitivity & Pain

When going to the dentist, one thing that many people want to avoid is feeling any pain in their mouth. This is especially true for more advanced treatments like fillings and deep cleanings. Not everyone is the same, so it's important to recognize different traits that may result in increased dental sensitivity. By recognizing these issues, you can make them clear to your dentist and get the appropriate of pain medication to numb your mouth and reduce the feeling of dental treatments. Read More 

3 Dental Treatment Options For Ankylosis Of Teeth

Ankylosis of teeth is a rare dental condition where growing teeth fuse with the surrounding alveolar bone, which prevents full eruption and limits orthodontic treatments. The ankylosis can strike one tooth or multiple teeth with the number of teeth affected making the treatment more complicated. Failure to treat ankylosis can leave the tooth partially erupted, which makes the tooth vulnerable to cavities and infection. What are some of the potential dental treatment options from a general dentist, cosmetic dentistry specialist, and an orthodontist? Read More